• Pater Lalor as represented in Jan Mitchell's carved bollard on the Geelong waterfront
    Peter Lalor
  • Peter Lalor as speaker
    Peter Lalor as speaker
  • Lalor House in Melbourne. It was built for Peter Lalor's son and Lalor himself lived there in his final years.
    Lalor House
  • Lalor grave in Melbourne General Cemetery
    Lalor grave
  • Inscription on Lalor grave
    Inscription on Lalor grave
Subscribe to our FREE Newsletter 'Great Things to do in Melbourne - the White Hat guide'

Submit an event, attraction or venue to be considered for listing on this website.

 

Peter Lalor

social achiever
5th February 1827 - 9th February 1889

 

Peter Lalor (pronounced “ law-luh” ) creates a problem for those who wish to interpret a complex three dimensional world into the highly limited and simplistic one dimensional concepts such as ‘left’ and ‘right’. Like many significant Australians, he thought deeply about the issues of his day, formed deeply held beliefs and acted on them. Although Lalor's beliefs and actions were consistent (and internally consistent) from his crucial time at the Eureka Stockade until his death, they don't fit easily into certain current forms of dumbed down social understanding. One solution to this problem has been for some people to describe Lalor as ‘a good thing’ for part of his life and ‘a bad thing’ for other parts of his life. Another common solution has been to ignore the parts of his life that are inconvenient and turn him into a subtractive myth.

In a speech to the Victorian Legislative Council in 1856, Peter Lalor said:

“ I would ask these gentlemen  what they mean by the term ‘democracy’ - do they mean Chartism or Communism or Republicanism? If so, I never was, I am not now, nor do I ever intend to be a democrat. But if a democrat means opposition to a tyrannical press, a tyrannical people, or a tyrannical government, then I have been, I am still, and will ever remain a democrat.”

In 1889, the dying Peter Lalor looked back on Eureka:

“ ’Tis better as it is now. We not only got all we fought for, but a little more. It is sweet and pleasant to die for one’s country, but it is sweeter to live and see the principles for which you have risked your life triumphant. I can look back calmly on those days. We were driven to do what we did by petty malice and spite.”

Peter Lalor is still commemorated with number of places and institutions named after him. There is the Melbourne suburb of Lalor, the Peter Lalor Secondary College and the electorate of Lalor to name a few.

The grave of Peter Lalor is visited on the Walking Tour of Melbourne General Cemetery.

 

Some forthcoming events:


___________________  White Hat  ___________________